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Article

Ewalt, Patricia Alice Littlefield  

Sadye L. M. Logan

Patricia Alice Littlefield Ewalt (1934–2022) was a strategic, organized, and brilliant social work administrator. She served the profession of social work as a planner, administrator, organizer, and educator. Her research and scholarship provided a collective vision of multiculturalism in social work practice and education. Within the profession and her administration, Ewalt advocated for inclusion, diversity, equity, accessibility, and belonging.

Article

Farley, Rawle  

Phylis J. Peterman

Rawle Farley, PhD (1922–2010), economist, scholar, academician, and advocate; known for his groundbreaking work in the study of economics in developing nations.

Article

Farmaian, Sattareh Farman  

Karen Smith Rotabi

Sattareh Farman Farmaian (1921–2012) founded the Tehran School of Social Work in Iran.

Article

Fauri, Fedele Frederick  

Maryann Syers

Fedele Fauri (1909–1981) was a specialist in social legislation and public welfare in the United States. He was dean of the University of Michigan School of Social Work for nearly 20 years and helped found the school's doctoral program which combined social work and the social sciences.

Article

Federico, Ronald Charles  

Dean Pierce

Ronald Federico (1941–1992) was a teacher, program administrator, and scholar. He was a leader in the development of undergraduate social work education. He provided curriculum consultation to countless social work education programs and was a mentor to many undergraduate social work educators.

Article

Feldman, Frances Lomas  

Sadye L. M. Logan

Frances Lomas Feldman (1912–2008), Professor Emerita at University of Southern California (USC) School of Social Work, was an indomitable force in the social work profession. Her primary research focus was the social and psychological meanings of work and money in American life. She will be remembered for her compassion and for establishing a standard of best practice to families that protected their dignity and supported their inner strengths when seeking aid.

Article

Fernandis, Sarah A. Collins  

Wilma Peebles-Wilkins

Sarah Fernandis (1863–1951) was a civic leader and organizer of public health activities in Black communities. She founded the first black social settlement in the United States. In 1920, she became the first Black social worker employed in the City Venereal Disease Clinic of the Baltimore Health Department.

Article

Fizdale, Ruth  

Linda Beebe

Ruth Fizdale (1908–1994) was a caseworker and administrator in health care. She was a pioneer in professionalizing social work working with many organizations such as NASW. For 19 years, she was executive director of the Arthur Lehman Counseling Service (ALCS).

Article

Flexner, Abraham  

Maryann Syers

Abraham Flexner (1866–1959) was a teacher and educational reformer. He challenged the professional status of the field of social work, concluding that it did not qualify as a profession as it lacked individual responsibility and educationally communicable techniques.

Article

Folks, Homer  

Sara Harmon

Homer Folks (1867–1967) was a social work pioneer, recognizing illness as a major cause of poverty. His public service activities included the care of dependent children, mental hygiene, tuberculosis control, public assistance programs, social research, and corrections and parole.

Article

Follett, Mary Parker  

Maryann Syers

Mary Parker Follett (1868–1933) was a vocational counsellor and social work reformer. She was active in vocational guidance, industrial relations, civic education, and settlement work. She was interested in “psychological interpenetration”: getting people from different socioeconomic and occupational backgrounds to understand one another's viewpoints

Article

Francois, Elma  

Karene-Anne Nathaniel

Elma Francois (1897–1944) was renowned for her Afro-Caribbean activism against the deplorable living conditions of the poor in the British colonies of the English-speaking Caribbean. She led many public demonstrations to highlight the plight of persons living in poverty. She made her greatest contribution as one of the first women in the trade union movement in Trinidad. Francois worked as a community organizer in grass-roots communities, educating persons about the importance of exercising their voices. Her approach to community organizing followed what has been taught about Jane Addams’ Settlement House Movement, where she immersed herself in communities and built strong relationships with members so she could really understand their plight and so gain their trust. Unlike Addams, Francois was from a very deprived background and was not formally educated. She is renowned as the first woman to be charged and acquitted for sedition in Trinidad during the rise of the trade union movement.

Article

Frankel, Lee Kaufer  

Maryann Syers

Lee Kaufer Frankel (1867–1931) was a chemist and developer of family casework practice. He is known for his contributions to health insurance, family services, and Jewish welfare. He was an instructor at the New York School of Philanthropy and was instrumental in establishing the Training School for Jewish Social Work.

Article

Frazier, Edward Franklin  

Wilma Peebles-Wilkins

Edward Franklin Frazier (1894–1962) was a research sociologist and educator. Noted for his work on the Black family and the Black middle class, he was head of the Department of Sociology at Howard University for 24 years.

Article

Freed, Anne O.  

Vesela Ivanova and Vaska Stancheva-Popkostadinova

Anne O. Freed (1917–2012) is among the pioneers in clinical social work in the United States. She served as a clinician, administrator, researcher, lecturer, and mentor. She advanced clinical social work practice and furthered the awareness of mental health issues in geriatric practice. Anne introduced clinical social work to Bulgaria.

Article

Freire, Paulo  

Edna Comer

Paulo Freire (1921–1997), a Brazilian educator and author, is known for his theoretical contributions to education. His text Pedagogy of the Oppressed is considered one of the foundational texts of the critical pedagogy movement.

Article

Galarza, Ernesto  

Juan Ramos

Ernesto Galarza (1905–1984) was a social work scholar at San Jose State University and an advocate of social justice. He was credited with ending the Bracero program and contributed to policy changes in the health and safety of farm workers.

Article

Gallaudet, Edward Miner  

Maryann Syers

Edward Miner Gallaudet (1837–1917) founded the Columbia Institute for the Deaf and Dumb in Washington, DC, to provide college-level education for deaf people and was president of the Convention of American Instructors of the Deaf from 1895 until 1917.

Article

Gallaudet, Thomas  

Maryann Syers

Thomas Gallaudet (1822–1902) devoted his life to ministering to deaf people. He was ordained a priest in 1851 and in 1852 he established St. Ann's Church for Deaf Mutes, conducting regular services in sign language.

Article

Gallaudet, Thomas Hopkins  

Maryann Syers

Thomas Hopkins Gallaudet (1787–1851) and his two sons, Thomas and Edward Miner, are renowned for their commitment to the education of deaf people. In 1817 he established the first free American school for the deaf in Hartford, Connecticut.