1-10 of 1,077 Results

Article

Valire C. Copeland and Betty Braxter

The upward trend in the number of Black maternal deaths between 2005 and 2020 warrants an in-depth assessment of risk factors associated with the increased maternal mortality rate in the United States for this subgroup population. The risk factors are multifactorial and, in part, have been organized into several categories: demographics, social determinants of health (SDOH), medical conditions, and the quality-of-care interventions by health systems providers. In addition, the overall trends, causes, and solutions to decrease maternal mortality current rates reflect the social inequities in our society. Black maternal deaths have been rising in recent years due to complex causes which stem from structural and systemic health inequities. In part, unvaccinated pregnant women were at greater risk of severe illness and hospitalization and even death if they were diagnosed with COVID-19. While Black Americans were disproportionately impacted by the pandemic, the disparities in maternal mortality predate and extend beyond the pandemic. In part, and together, the leading causes of pregnancy-related deaths include cardiovascular disease, other medical conditions and infections, cardiomyopathy, blood clots in the lung hypertensive disorders related to pregnancy, adverse pregnancy outcomes, racial bias of providers, and perceived racial discrimination from patients. In addition, an overview of nonmedical factors referred to as SDOH, which intersect with health status outcomes, will be discussed. An overview of Black women’s maternal mortality and morbidity, factors contributing to poor maternal health status outcomes, and intervention strategies at the provider, health systems, and policy levels are provided. Social workers in health care systems function as health care providers and clinicians. Therefore, contributing medical and nonmedical issues are factors to consider for a holistic perspective during engagement, assessment, and intervention. The terms Black women and Black birthing persons are used interchangeably.

Article

Faye Mishna and Cheryl Regehr

Marion Bogo (1942–2021), Professor in the Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work at the University of Toronto, was a preeminent Canadian scholar and world-renowned expert who transformed social work education and practice in Canada and across the globe. Over a 4-decade-long career, Bogo instituted major innovations in social work practice education including developing a holistic model of competence and cutting-edge simulation-based educational practices. Bogo had a profound influence on preparing generations of social workers and educators.

Article

Husain Lateef and Dominique Horton

Although scholars in the applied social sciences and allied professions have paid increasing attention to many of the disparities experienced by African American youth, very few efforts have been made to increase awareness of how culturally responsive practice can inform prevention and intervention efforts with this population. In response, the authors present an overview of cultural factors among African American youth, including information on their ancestral heritage, language, and known findings from culturally responsive interventions, to establish guideposts for next steps required to advance practice within social work. Subsequently, the authors conclude by sharing implications for continued research with communities and preliminary steps for social work practitioners that work with African American youth and their families.

Article

Kana Matsuo

Namae Takayuki (1867–1957) was a Christian social worker and professor who contributed significantly to social welfare work, education, and policies in Japan before World War II. After his studies at the New York School of Philanthropy and Boston University, Namae returned to Japan in 1904, despite several struggles, where he became a commissioned officer for the Japanese government, responsible for the development of major social work programs. During this time, he visited the United States, the United Kingdom, Denmark, New Zealand, and other countries to study their approach to social work and policies, and thereafter, he introduced these good practices in Japan. Namae maintained a humanitarian view in his development of social work policies. He dedicated his life to solving social issues in urban areas, protecting women and children, and supporting the poor. Ultimately, Namae Takayuki pioneered the indigenization of social work in Japan.

Article

Yasuhiro Kuroki

A Japanese social work educator and researcher, Tatsuo Wakabayashi was one of the founders and developers of the Japanese Association of Schools of Social Work (JASSW). Wakabayashi had a broad perspective and a solid ability to see the future of the times. He contributed to the development of social work theory and research in Japan.

Article

Nigel Hall

Father Ted Rogers was a remarkable and committed Jesuit priest who was instrumental in founding the first school of social work in the southern African country of Zimbabwe, then named Rhodesia. He remained as the Principal of the School of Social Work for 21 years and contributed to social development and poverty relief activities. Throughout his life, Fr. Rogers saw it as a priority to work in areas of urgent social need and in tackling social injustice. In later years he was known and respected in southern Africa for his contribution to the effort to fight HIV/AIDS and his work toward peace and reconciliation.

Article

Yasuhiro Kuroki

Yamamuro (1872–1940) was one of Japan’s leading popular evangelists. He contributed to the founding and development of the Salvation Army in Japan. During his lifetime, he also established various social welfare facilities and played a major role in improving social welfare activities in Japan.

Article

Philip Mendes

Connie Benn (1926–2011) was a prominent Australian social work practitioner, researcher, and social activist. As a leader of the Australian Association of Social Workers in the 1960s, she encouraged social workers to move beyond a narrow focus on casework to participate in broader movements for social reform. In the early 1970s, she led the Brotherhood of St Laurence’s Family Centre Project, which pioneered the application of structural social work methods to assisting a group of disadvantaged families.

Article

Karene-Anne Nathaniel

Audrey Layne Jeffers (1898–1968) was an early feminist of African descent with a commitment to the advancement of Black women, education of girls, services to children with disabilities, and government responsibility for social welfare. She mobilized young women to form the Coterie of Social Workers in Trinidad that began a meal program for underprivileged school children in the 1920s, which shaped the National School Feeding Program that today offers free meals to all school students. This led to the establishment of other similar facilities in other parts of the country, as well as the opening of homes for dispossessed young women, the elderly, and the blind, and daycare facilities to help working women. These facilities form the backdrop for the practice of social work in the Caribbean. She was instrumental in the hosting of the first women’s conference which made numerous recommendations including equal opportunities for women and women in the police service. She was the first woman to be elected to local government, and later nominated to the legislative council by the governor. Jeffers was a champion for disadvantaged women and girls, but notably opened the door for women in politics in the English-speaking Caribbean.

Article

Helle Strauss

Manon Lüttichau (1900–1995), who was born a privileged noblewoman, untraditionally sought education and personal independence. She served as a charity worker for 10 years, then became the first paid social helper in Denmark. She was a pioneer for social workers as important professionals in hospital departments. She became inspired by many tours in Europe and the United States for studies of social work and social work education. ML was initiator of the establishment of the first social school. This happened at a time when economic crises and several social reforms increased the need for a professional social work profession. A group of enthusiastic academics and social workers established a volunteer working committee for foundation of a social school . Here it was discussed whether the school should be independence of religion. The result was an independent curriculum, a schedule, a small faculty, creation of teaching material and organisation of administration and practice placement. Development of social work ethics, holistic perspective, and casework were among the subjects in the professional education. ML became later the initiator of the Association for Educated Social Workers in Denmark and she was also serving in Burma for the UN as a social welfare advisor. Similarities and differences between the first education, ML’s viewpoints and modern social work education are identified. ML was living independent of class traditions and other people’s presumptions, but not a declared feminist.