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Wilma Peebles-Wilkins

Inabel Burns Lindsay (1900–1983) was the first dean of the Howard University School of Social Work, the second U.S. accredited school serving Black students. She published numerous articles on community leadership, elderly people, and Black participation in social welfare.

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Wilma Peebles-Wilkins

George Edmund Haynes (1880–1960) was a social scientist and co-founder of the National Urban League. He was also the director of Negro Economics for the U.S. Department of Labor and of Fisk University's Department of Social Sciences.

Article

Black people number about 46.8 million or 14% of the U.S. population. Throughout U.S. history, regardless of social class, Black people have had to remain cognizant of their race. The COVID-19 pandemic and police shootings of unarmed Black people have revealed that American racism toward Blacks is as virulent today as it has always been. Because of purposeful structural inequality, Black people in America suffer disproportionately in every sector of human activity. They are still facing social issues such as racism, substance abuse, mass incarceration, poverty, police brutality and police murder, infant mortality that is twice as high as among whites, residential segregation, racial profiling, and discrimination. And yet the strengths of the Black community have allowed it to thrive amid these arduous circumstances.

Article

Maryann Syers

Lester Blackwell Granger (1896–1976), an outspoken advocate for interracial cooperation and equal opportunity for Black people, was best known for his leadership of the Urban League and for his efforts to desegregate the U.S. armed forces after World War II.