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Katherine “Kay” Brownell Oettinger (1903–1997) was an authority on the care and upbringing of children with special emphasis on children with intellectual disabilities.

Article

Beatrice N. Saunders

Harriett M. Bartlett (1897–1987) was a social worker and theoretician who served as president of the American Association of Medical Social Workers from 1942 to 1944. She highlighted social functioning as a central focus of social work practice.

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Kenneth S. Carpenter

Bertram Beck (1918–2000) was a social worker who contributed to juvenile delinquency prevention and held many leadership positions in social work organizations. At Fordham University he was instrumental in creating the managed care institute and the religion and poverty institute.

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Larraine M. Edwards

Julia Clifford Lathrop (1858–1932), an advocate of child welfare and mentally ill people, helped found the country's first children's mental hygiene clinic, the Juvenile Psychopathic Institute, in 1909. She became the first director of the U.S. Children's Bureau in 1912.

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Maryann Syers

Katharine Fredrica Lenroot (1891–1982), praised for her contributions to child welfare, juvenile delinquency, and child labor laws, worked at the U.S. Children's Bureau for 37 years. She became its chief in 1934 and represented the United States at UNICEF.

Article

Jean K. Quam

Martha May Eliot (1891–1978) was an educator and public health official. She was the first woman president of the American Public Health Association. She became chief medical consultant for UNICEF in 1947. She was later assistant director general of WHO, and the U.S. representative to the executive board of UNICEF.

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Larraine M. Edwards

Florence Kelley (1859–1932) crusaded against child labor, which led to the establishment of the U.S. Children's Bureau in 1912. In 1892 she was head of the Factory Inspection Department and became director of the National Consumer League in 1899.

Article

Maryann Syers

Lydia Rapoport (1923–1971) was a psychiatric social worker at the University of Chicago hospitals and Jewish Children's Bureau, and on faculty at University of California, Berkeley. Her most important contribution to social work practice was crisis intervention and short-term therapy.

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Larraine M. Edwards

Lillian Wald (1867–1940) was a pioneer in public health nursing. In 1893, she co-founded the Henry Street Settlement which provided professional nursing care to poor people at little or no cost. She is credited with the proposal that led to the establishment of the Children's Bureau in 1912.