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Sadye L. M. Logan

Joan Bonner Conway’s (1920–2008) career in social work spanned over four decades. Her practice and administrative skills included large and small hospitals and rehabilitation settings. Through her pioneering efforts in these settings she was able to make significant contributions to the social work specialty of medical social work.

Article

Sadye L. M. Logan

Margaret Daniel (1908–1997) provided outstanding leadership and left an indelible mark on the social work profession in both social work education and practice through her work at the Veterans’ Administration (VA) and through her contributions at the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), leading to high standards in social work education.

Article

Jonathan Dickens

Clement Attlee was prime minister of the United Kingdom from 1945 to 1951, leading his Labour government on a radical program of postwar reconstruction. Attlee himself came from a privileged background, and the decisive influences that brought him to left-wing politics came from his time working with children and families in the East End of London, in the years before World War I. His book The Social Worker, published in 1920, drew on these experiences.

Article

Halaevalu F. O. Vakalahi, Michael M. Sinclair, Bradford W. Sheafor, and Puafisi Tupola

Professions are developed and maintained through various professional organizations and associations. As social work has evolved in terms of context and content, the professional membership and professional education organizations have periodically unified, separated, and later reunified in the attempt to maintain an identity as a single profession, yet respond to the needs and interests of different practice specialties, educational levels, special interest groups within social work, and diverse cultures and communities. There are approximately 40 known social work organizations and associations across the country, which recognizes the continuous important contributions of emerging groups and entities that represent the diversity that exists in the profession and the diverse critical issues that warrant a timely response. Some of these organizations and associations experience sustained growth and national presence, while others remain on the local level or are no longer active. A few examples of these major social work organizations and associations are described herein.