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Article

Diane Rae Davis

Harm reduction is a helping strategy that attempts to alleviate the social, legal, and medical consequences associated with unmanaged addiction, and in so doing, limit the harms, such as infectious disease (HIV, hepatitis), violence, criminal activity, and early death, without necessarily attempting to “cure” the addiction. While abstinence may be an ideal outcome from a harm reduction standpoint, abstinence is viewed as only one of several means of improving a person's life. Harm reduction strategies are well known in the U.S. through methadone maintenance and syringe-exchange programs, and are increasingly relied on in the treatment of co-existing disorders.

Article

Lia Nower and Kyle Caler

Gambling disorder is a significant public health concern. The recent and continued proliferation of land-based and interactive gambling opportunities has increased both accessibility and acceptability of gambling in the United States and abroad, resulting in greater and more varied participation. However, there is currently no designated federal funding for prevention, intervention, treatment, or research, and states are left to adopt varying standards on an ad hoc basis. Social workers receive little or no training in screening or treating problem gamblers, though research suggests that a significant proportion of those with mental health and other addictive disorders also gamble excessively. Raising awareness about the nature and scope of gambling disorder and its devastating implications for families and children is a first-step toward integrating gambling into prevention, assessment and treatment education in social work. This, in turn, will increase the chances of early identification and intervention across settings and insure that social workers can lend a knowledgeable and credible voice to addressing this hidden addiction.