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Article

Shirley Otis-Green

Health social work is a subspecialization of social work concerned with a person's adjustment to changes in one's health and the impact this has on that person's social network. Social workers in every setting must be ready to assist individuals and families adjusting to illness and coping with medical crises. This entry provides a brief overview and history of health social work and describes the settings and roles where this work is practiced. Significant challenges and opportunities in clinical care, research, education, and policy are discussed. Standards and guidelines for quality practice are then noted.

Article

Betty J. Ruth, Sarah Sisco, and Jamie Wyatt Marshall

Public health social work is a subdiscipline within social work that uses multifaceted transdisciplinary approaches to promote health equity and mitigate human health problems. Originating in the early 20th century, public health social work applies social work and public health theories, frameworks, research, and collaborative practice to address contemporary health issues. Epidemiologically informed and characterized by prevention, health promotion, and other integrative practices, public health social work is highly relevant to pervasive 21st-century challenges, such as health inequity, behavioral health integration, chronic disease, health reform implementation, and global health. With its strong focus on health impact and population health, public health social work is central to the profession’s viability and success in the post–Affordable Care Act (ACA) health environment.

Article

Edward Pecukonis

The concept of health profession centrism and its effects on interprofessional education is important to Social Work practice. Profession centrism is concerned with a student’s professional socialization and their ability to work effectively with other health professionals and clients. This cultural frame determines the salience of curriculum content, core values, practice rituals and customs. It determines the meaning and etiology of symptoms and what constitutes health and treatment success. The interprofessional education (IPE) agenda is often seen as “soft curriculum” content and put to the side for the rigors of health sciences. Paradoxically, it is these issues of communication, ethics, role definition, and working as a team that creates problems among health professionals which compromise safety and efficiency in patient/client care. Learning to minimize profession centrism is a critical education and training objective for health social workers.

Article

Gloria Hegge

Rene Sand (1877–1953), Belgian social worker and physician, was best known in the field of social work for being co-founder of the International Association of Schools of Social Work (IASSW) in 1928, and serving as its president from 1946 to 1953.

Article

John F. Longres

Carmen Rivera de Alvarado (1910–1973) was a pioneer in social work practice and education. In 1935 she founded the first professional association of Puerto Rican social workers. She was a professor at the Universities of Puerto Rico and Pennsylvania.

Article

Jun Sung Hong and Wynne Sandra Korr

Since the 1980s, cultural competency has increasingly been recognized as a salient factor in the helping process, which requires social-work professionals to effectively integrate cultural knowledge and sensitivity with skills. This entry chronicles the history of mental-health services and the development of cultural competency in social-work practice, followed by a discussion of mental-health services utilization and barriers to services among racial/ethnic minorities. Directions for enhancing cultural competency in mental-health services are also highlighted.

Article

Tara M. Powell, Shannondora Billiot, and Leia Y. Saltzman

Natural and man-made disasters have become much more frequent since the start of the 21st century. Disasters have numerous deleterious impacts. They disrupt individuals, families, and communities, causing displacement, food insecurity, injury, loss of livelihoods, conflict, and epidemics. The physical and mental health impact of a disaster can have extensive short- and long-term consequences. Immediately after a traumatic event, individuals may experience an array of reactions such as anxiety, depression, acute stress symptoms, shock, dissociation, allergies, injuries, or breathing problems. Given the economic and human impact of disasters, social workers are often quick to respond. Historically, the social work profession has provided services on the individual level, but initiatives have expanded to address community preparedness, response, and recovery. This article will explore the complexities of disaster response and recovery. Health and mental health impacts will be examined. Resilience and posttraumatic growth will then be discussed, exploring how individuals overcome adversity and trauma. Individual and community level preparedness mitigation, response, and recovery will explore how the field of social work has evolved as disasters have increased. Followed by an exploration of how social work has evolved to develop individual and community level preparedness, mitigation, response, and recovery activities as disasters have increased. Finally, the article will examine special populations, including those with disabilities, children, indigenous people, older adults, and social service workers in all phases of disasters. As disasters grow more frequent it is vital for social work professionals to improve their efforts. We will conclude the chapter by examining the coordinated efforts the social work profession is involved in to help communities recover and even thrive after a traumatic event.

Article

Tanya Smith Brice

Jay Carrington Chunn, II, (1938–2013), was a leader in social work education, a professor, and an author who focused on public health and policy within urban populations.

Article

Hans S. Falck

Thomas Owen Carlton (1937–1992) was an expert in curriculum development in social work education as well as an author, an editor, and a scholar in health social work and social policy. He believed history influences social welfare planning.

Article

Ruth Irelan Knee

Milton Wittman (1915–1994) was a social worker, writer, and leader in social work, public health, and mental health. He played a key role in the expansion of opportunities for social work education and for the involvement of social workers in the provision of mental health services.

Article

Robert Carter Arnold

Helen Northen (1912–2006) spent her teaching career at the University of Southern California and was considered one of the foremost authorities on social work with groups. She also published extensively on clinical social work practice and health care.

Article

Kenneth R. Wedel

Ruth Irelan Knee (1920–2008) was a leading social worker in the formative years of public mental health programming and was a contributor to the “patients’ rights movement” for institutionalized persons.

Article

Stephen H. Gorin, Julie S. Darnell, and Heidi L. Allen

This entry describes the development and key provisions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), which instituted a major overhaul of the U.S. health system, much of which took effect in 2014. The key provisions of the ACA included an individual mandate to purchase insurance, an employer mandate to offer coverage to most workers, an expansion of Medicaid to all persons below 138 percent of the federal poverty level (FPL), minimum benefit standards, elimination of preexisting condition exclusions, and reforms to improve health-care quality and lower costs. This historic legislation has deep roots in U.S. history and represents the culmination of a century-long effort to expand health care and mental health coverage to all citizens.

Article

Tomi Gomory and Daniel Dunleavy

Social work is perhaps most distinctive for its clear and outspoken commitment toward improving the well-being of society’s vulnerable and disadvantaged groups, while still emphasizing the importance of respecting and defending personal rights and freedoms. Though there is a fundamental necessity for coercion, or its threat, for eliciting civil social behavior in a well-functioning society, it is professionally and ethically imperative that social workers make explicit our rationales for, justifications of, and the evidence used to support or reject coercive practices in our work. Social work’s engagement with coercion inevitably entails the ethical and social policy arguments for and against its use, as shown in a review of the empirical evidence regarding its impact on the professions’ clients, exemplified by three domains: (1) child welfare, (2) mental health, and (3) addictions. Recommendations for future improvements involve balancing the potential for harm against the benefits of coercive actions.

Article

Michael A. Patchner and Lisa S. Patchner

The complicated nature of illness and health care delivery along with the complexity of insurance and health policy demand team-based health care. As a consequence, social workers have become engaged in team-based health care with numerous other professionals within multiple settings. Through the engagement of client-centered practice social workers experience systems that weigh the provision of direct services against macro quantitative accountability. This has resulted in newly defined roles and expectations for social workers who are well trained for both micro and macro practice. In multiple health care settings, social workers are partners in team-based models of care where patient-centered practice is a component within larger public and private delivery systems.

Article

Shrivridhi Shukla and Arpita Gupta

India’s rapid economic growth is accompanied by economic inequality, poverty, and a range of social issues, thus, raising important questions concerning the breadth and depth of social protection and promotion policies prevalent in the country. The social welfare system in India is different for the formal and informal sectors of the economy. It consists of two largely parallel systems. With respect to the formal economy or the organized sector, it operates directly through the government, state-owned enterprises, and/ or private corporations that provide reasonably strong social protection to their employees through mandatory legislations spanning aspects such as payment of gratuity, employees’ provident fund, and the employees’ state insurance fund. In contrast, the informal or the unorganized sector is covered through a fragmented system of welfare schemes and benefits provided by the central government and the respective state governments. Along with tracing the historical evolution of India’s welfare system, this article outlines the constitutional place of welfare in the country. With respect to the informal sector of the economy, it provides an overview of some of the key promotion and protection-orientated welfare policies and schemes, including those that address poverty, unemployment, education, health and food insecurity. Further, it discusses the barriers experienced by people in accessing welfare benefits, such as corruption and bureaucratic hurdles, and challenges faced by the government in welfare provision, such as scale of operation and identification of the target population groups. Finally, it assesses the country’s welfare system in light of the Global Social Protection Floor Initiative of the ILO-UN.

Article

Addie Weaver, Joseph Himle, Gail Steketee, and Jordana Muroff

This entry offers an overview of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). Cognitive behavioral therapy is introduced and its development as a psychosocial therapeutic approach is described. This entry outlines the central techniques and intervention strategies utilized in CBT and presents common disorder-specific applications of the treatment. The empirical evidence supporting CBT is summarized and reviewed. Finally, the impact of CBT on clinical social work practice and education is discussed, with attention to the treatment’s alignment with the profession’s values and mission.

Article

Kenneth S. Carpenter

Robert Vinter (1921–2006) was an educator and consultant and worked at the University of Michigan School of Social Work for 31 years. He was well known for this work in the fields of juvenile delinquency and group work. He was a founding member of the National Association of Social Workers

Article

Alex Gitterman

Hyman J. Weiner (1926–1980) was a program innovator, administrator, and educator. He was a pioneer in the conceptualization and implementation of group services in the health field. He also pioneered an Industrial Social Welfare Center and contributed to the building of industrial welfare curricula throughout the United States.

Article

Matthew Epperson, Julian Thompson, and Kelli E. Canada

This article discusses the emergence, structure, and purpose of the mental health court. It details the therapeutic aspects of the mental health court and its function as a specialized-treatment court serving persons with serious mental illnesses in the criminal justice system. Guiding themes, such as the criminalization of mental illness, therapeutic jurisprudence, and drug-treatment courts are described. It also identifies key legislation that contributed to the funding and proliferation of mental health courts. The effectiveness of mental health court, along with current criticisms regarding its impact on participants’ mental health and recidivism outcomes, are also covered. Last, social work values and the various roles of social workers in the mental health court are highlighted to demonstrate the relevance of mental health court to contemporary social work practice and intervention.