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Article

Environmental conditions, interpersonal relationships, and adverse experiences affect developmental outcomes and human functioning. Their affect is perhaps no more clearly visible than when examined through a neuroscientific lens. Key focus is specifically on mind-body-environment transactions which can be beneficial or destructive; the neuroscience of adversity which can explain whether and why hardship will result in toxic stress;s, and the neuroscience behind behavior change which can help tailor strategic interventions.e. The brain’s lifelong capacity to change and grow gives relevance to the hard work of the social work profession, as our interventions can be understood as potential neurobiological turning points across the life course. As will be seen, neuroscience helps to explain many of the challenges social workers confront in their work with clients and client systems. Yet neuroscience can also serve as a guide to address these same challenges by directing targeted interventions. As more and more schools of social work incorporate neuroscience into their curricula and social work scholars write about how this science could inform social work practice, the social work professionwill become a central partner in interdisciplinary coalitions that use neuroscientific discoveries to inform programs and policies to advance optimal human functioning and wellbeing across all system levels.

Article

Elizabeth A. Segal

This article defines and explains the concept and trait of social empathy and the relationship to interpersonal empathy. Both concepts are explained using the latest cognitive neuroscience research on brain activity. Through brain imaging, the components that together make up the full array of empathy have been identified and are discussed in relation to social work practice. The application of social empathy in the policy-making arena is described, and the implications for social work practice to enhance empathy are discussed.