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Adrienne Asch and Nancy R. Mudrick

Significant visual impairment affects ~8 million Americans, 1.8 million of whom are blind and must find nonvisual methods of performing life roles. Social workers should not assume that people with visual impairment or blindness are unable to work, have families, or engage in sports or travel, or that vision limitations are necessarily a part of every presenting problem. Key roles for social workers include assisting in access to services and training and advocacy to combat discrimination and exclusion.

Article

John F. Longres

Soledad Rodriguez Pastor (1897–1958) was a pioneer in services for deaf and blind people and a leader in the development of professional social work in Puerto Rico. She became director of the Institute for Blind Children in 1936.

Article

Larraine M. Edwards

Samuel Gridley Howe (1801–1876) was a noted philanthropist, educator, and advocate for the physically and mentally handicapped. He was director of the New England Asylum for the Blind and served on the Massachusetts State Board of Charities from 1863.

Article

John F. Longres

Beatriz Lassalle (1882–1965) is recognized as the most important pioneer of social work practice in Puerto Rico. She promoted social action, participated in civic affairs, and dedicated herself to the needs of children and families, especially those affected by blindness.