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Article

Shirley Otis-Green

Health social work is a subspecialization of social work concerned with a person's adjustment to changes in one's health and the impact this has on that person's social network. Social workers in every setting must be ready to assist individuals and families adjusting to illness and coping with medical crises. This entry provides a brief overview and history of health social work and describes the settings and roles where this work is practiced. Significant challenges and opportunities in clinical care, research, education, and policy are discussed. Standards and guidelines for quality practice are then noted.

Article

John F. Longres

Gordon Hamilton (1892–1967) was a practitioner, an educator, a consultant, and writer whose works, including Theory and Practice of Social Casework, profoundly influenced the development of casework theory. She was editor in chief of Social Work from 1956 until 1962.

Article

Larraine M. Edwards

Mary Cromwell Jarrett (1876–1961) delineated the specialty of psychiatric social work in mental hospitals and worked to alleviate problems associated with chronic illness while at the Welfare Council of New York City. She also founded the Psychiatric Social Workers' Club.

Article

Jean K. Quam

Richard Clarke Cabot (1865–1939) was a physician and educator from Massachusetts, who initiated the first social work department at a US medical school. He instituted home visits to gain information about patients and make medicine more efficient through social work.

Article

Jean K. Quam

Ida Maud Cannon (1877–1960) was director of the Social Service Department at Massachusetts General Hospital, where she defined and developed medical social work. She moved medical social work into the community and provided social workers with specialized medical knowledge.