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date: 04 July 2022

Sex Trafficking Policylocked

Sex Trafficking Policylocked

  • Kathleen BergquistKathleen BergquistUniversity of Nevada, Las Vegas

Summary

Human trafficking, to include labor and sex trafficking, was recognized by the United Nations in 2000 through the Convention Against Transnational Organized Crime, supplemented by the Protocol to Prevent, Suppress, and Punish Trafficking in Persons Especially Women and Children (Palermo Protocol). Nation states that ratified the protocol signaled their intent to be legally bound by it and consequently to develop policies to implement within their respective countries. The definition of human trafficking generally includes the commercial exploitation of persons for labor or sex. The International Labour Organization estimated in 2016 that of the 24.9 million people trapped in forced labor, 4.8 million are being sexually exploited. This article provides a historical context for sex trafficking, some discussion about the political evolution of sex trafficking legislation, current knowledge, and practice.

Subjects

  • Criminal Justice
  • Clinical and Direct Practice
  • Ethics and Values
  • International and Global Issues
  • Mental and Behavioral Health
  • Populations and Practice Settings

Updated in this version

Content and references updated for the Encyclopedia of Macro Social Work.

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