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date: 29 October 2020

Group Work with School-Aged Childrenlocked

  • Craig Winston LeCroyCraig Winston LeCroyArizona State University
  •  and Jenny McCullough CosgroveJenny McCullough CosgroveLeCroy & Milligan Associates

Summary

Research has shown groups are an efficient and effective modality for interventions with school-aged children. Psychoeducational and psychotherapeutic groups are frequently used to guide children in areas such as skills training, emotional regulation, violence prevention, and grief. There are key developmental questions to consider when working with children that take into consideration factors such as cognitive development and emotional maturity. Overall, groups can be an efficient and effective intervention in the school setting for use by school social workers.

Subjects

  • Child and Adolescent Social Work
  • Direct Practice and Clinical Social Work
  • Social Work Practice Settings

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