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date: 28 June 2022

Conflict Theory for Macro Practicelocked

Conflict Theory for Macro Practicelocked

  • Susan P. RobbinsSusan P. RobbinsUniversity of Houston
  •  and George S. LeibowitzGeorge S. LeibowitzStony Brook University

Summary

Conflict theory encompasses several theories that share underlying assumptions about interlocking systems of oppression and how they are maintained. The relevance of Marx’s theory of class conflict, C. Wright Mills’s power elite, and pluralist interest group theory are all important to understand and address social and economic gaps and informing policy for macro practice.

Conflict theory can provide an understanding of health disparities, racial differences in mortality rates, class relationships associated with negative outcomes, poverty, discrimination in criminal justice, as well as numerous factors that are broadly associated with inequality embedded in social structures. Social workers play a significant role in addressing disparities in research, curricula, primary and secondary intervention, and public policy, and conflict theory can provide the framework necessary to enrich this understanding.

Subjects

  • Criminal Justice
  • Human Behavior
  • Macro Practice
  • Policy and Advocacy
  • Race, Ethnicity, and Culture
  • Social Justice and Human Rights

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