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date: 28 June 2022

Labor Unions in the United Stateslocked

Labor Unions in the United Stateslocked

  • Paul A. KurzmanPaul A. KurzmanHunter College, City University of New York

Summary

Labor unions are major participants in the world of work in the United States and abroad. Although union membership in the United States has steadily declined since the 1950s, unions continue to provide a critical countervailing force to the largely unchecked power of employers, whose strength has increased. Hence, to be successful in meeting their goals, unions must learn to deal creatively with the realities of automation, globalization, privatization, de-unionization, and the trend toward contingent work arrangements. Nonetheless, despite the disadvantages and struggles they face, labor unions in 2020 represented almost 16 million wage and salary workers, who have families who vote; therefore, they remain a core constituency for political and corporate America and a significant part of the economic landscape in this country and abroad. Unions remain a core constituency and continue to be a significant part of the economic landscape in this country and beyond.

Subjects

  • Policy and Advocacy
  • Social Justice and Human Rights
  • Social Work Profession

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