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date: 30 October 2020

Occupational Social Worklocked

  • Paul A. KurzmanPaul A. KurzmanSilberman School of Social WorkHunter College, City University of New York

Summary

Occupational (industrial) social work, one of the newest fields of policy and practice, has evolved since the mid-1960s to become a dynamic arena for social service and practice innovation. Focusing on work, workers, and work organizations, occupational social work provides unique opportunities for the profession to affect the decisions and provisions of management and labor. Despite the risks inherent in working in powerful and often proprietary settings, being positioned to help workers, their families, and job hunters enables professional social workers to have the leverage both to provide expert service and to become agents of progressive social change.

Subjects

  • Occupations, Professions, and Work

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