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date: 24 June 2021

Privilegelocked

Privilegelocked

  • Cheryl L. FranksCheryl L. FranksJohn Jay College of Criminal Justice
  •  and Marion RiedelMarion RiedelColumbia University

Summary

Privilege is the invisible advantage and resultant unearned benefits afforded to dominant groups of people because of a variety of sociodemographic traits. Privilege provides economic and social boosts to dominant groups while supporting the structural barriers to other groups imposed by prejudice. Social work education and practice seldom challenges us to evaluate the effects of privilege on our professional relationships and the concomitant systems of oppression that marginalize many of the groups we work with. Privilege nurtures dependence, distances us from others, and creates a barrier to reflective social work practice. Acknowledging the effects of privilege increases our capacity to affirm our humanity and that of the communities we serve.

Subjects

  • Administration and Management
  • Macro Practice
  • Poverty
  • Race, Ethnicity, and Culture
  • Social Work Profession

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