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date: 30 June 2022

Radical Social Worklocked

Radical Social Worklocked

  • Mary Bricker-Jenkins, Mary Bricker-JenkinsTemple University
  • Rosemary BarberaRosemary BarberaLa Salle University
  •  and Barbara Hunter-Randall JosephBarbara Hunter-Randall JosephCollege at Old Westbury, State University of New York

Summary

Since the beginning of the profession, radical social work has avowed a commitment to practice dedicated to advancing human rights and social and economic justice. Since the 1980s, the rise of neoliberal global capitalism has vitiated support for robust social welfare programs; its conservatizing effect on the profession has rendered the radical agenda both more urgent and more difficult. Ensuing polarization in the economic, social, and political arenas has been mirrored in the profession as well: differences widen between the micro and macro realms and privatization engulfs the public welfare arena; the epistemological bases of knowledge and prevailing theories form competing camps; the entire project of social work for social welfare is challenged as Eurocentric and implicitly white supremacist. Radical social work has responded to these challenges with innovation and energy, deriving insight from and participating in spontaneous uprisings and resistance, while engaging theoretical and practical conundrums.

Subjects

  • Ethics and Values
  • International and Global Issues
  • Macro Practice
  • Policy and Advocacy
  • Social Justice and Human Rights

Updated in this version

Content and references updated for the Encyclopedia of Macro Social Work.

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