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date: 26 June 2022

Settlements and Neighborhood Centerslocked

Settlements and Neighborhood Centerslocked

  • Robert Fisher, Robert FisherUniversity of Connecticut
  • Michael FabricantMichael FabricantHunter College, City University of New York
  •  and Lukas ChampagneLukas ChampagneUniversity of Connecticut

Summary

Settlement houses are one prism through which the contested history of macro social work can be viewed. The early settlements spearheaded social reform while building community solidarity. Historic shifts in the political economy changed the work of settlements, particularly the development of neighborhood houses. The dynamic interplay in the past decades between the corporatization of not-for-profit culture, shrinking government funding, and a redefinition of settlement services have particularly affected settlement work. The traditional view of settlements and neighborhood centers, that located people of color, especially Black people who addressed structural barriers and offered transformative solutions, outside its gaze has missed a good deal of history. Needless to say, this is not meant to be an all-inclusive listing of resources and readings nor the last word on settlement macro practice and macro challenges.

Subjects

  • Human Behavior
  • Macro Practice
  • Policy and Advocacy

Updated in this version

Content and references updated for the Encyclopedia of Macro Social Work.

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