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date: 03 December 2022

Latinos and Latinas: Mexicanslocked

Latinos and Latinas: Mexicanslocked

  • Herman CurielHerman CurielProfessor, Anne & Henry Zarrow School of Social Work, University of Oklahoma; 2011 NASW Pioneer

Summary

According to the 2010 Census, 308.7 million people resided in the United States on April 1, 2010, of which 50.5 million (or 16%) were of Hispanic or Latino origin. The Mexican-origin population increased by 54% since the previous Census, and it had the largest numeric increase (11.2 million), growing from 20.6 million in 2000 to 31.8 million in 2010 (Ennis, Rio-Vargas, & Albert, 2011). The current U.S. Census demographic information was used to project the social needs of Mexican-origin Hispanics. An estimated 11.2 million unauthorized Hispanic-origin migrants reside in the United States. Select provisions of the failed 2007 Immigration Reform Act are discussed in context of the Reagan Administration’s 1986 Immigration Reform Act. Key words are defined to facilitate understanding of issues presented that affect the well-being of the Mexican-origin population. Best social work practices for working with Mexican-origin Hispanics are proposed in the context of issues identified in the narrative. Future trends are speculative predictions with suggestions based on the author's social work practice experience, research, and knowledge of the literature.

Subjects

  • Populations and Practice Settings
  • Poverty
  • Race, Ethnicity, and Culture

Updated in this version

Article updated and revised to reflect recent research and demographic population changes

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