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date: 28 October 2020

Dominican Ethnic Identities, National Borders, and Literaturelocked

  • Lorgia García PeñaLorgia García PeñaDepartment of Romance Languages and Literatures, Harvard University

Summary

The formation of Dominican identity has been linked to the historical nexus that placed Dominicans in relationship to Haiti, Spain, and the United States. The foundational literature of the 19th century sought to shape national identity as emerging from racial hybridity through notions of mestizaje that obscured Dominican African roots. In the early to mid-20th century, at the hands of the Trujillo intelligentsia, these myths shaped legal, educational, and military structures, leading to violence and disenfranchisement. Since the death of Trujillo in 1961, Dominican writers, artists, and scholars have been articulating other ways of being Dominican that include Afro-Dominican episteme and accounts for the experiences of colonialisms, bordering, and diasporic movements. These articulations of dominicanidad have led to a vibrant, exciting, and incredibly diverse literary production at home and abroad.

Subjects

  • Literary Studies (American)
  • Literary Studies (Fiction, Novelists, and Prose Writers)
  • Literary Studies - World
  • Literary Theory and Cultural Studies

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